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Charles Dickens
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 107

Charles Dickens

In this book, two Dickens scholars examine the fascinating life of this hugely popular literary figure. Born in Portsmouth in 1812, Dickens rose to fame within his lifetime and, to the present day, has never been out of print.

Teaching Excellence in Higher Education
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 257

Teaching Excellence in Higher Education

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2013-12-11
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  • Publisher: Springer

Marshall Gregory argues that teachers at the university and high school levels can achieve teaching excellence by grounding their teaching in pedagogical theory that takes into account students' abilities and the ultimate goals of teaching: to develop students' capacities for thought, reflection, questioning, and engagement to their fullest extent.

Domestic Terror in Victorian Culture
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 394

Domestic Terror in Victorian Culture

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2002
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  • Publisher: Unknown

None

Victorian Secrecy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 238

Victorian Secrecy

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2016-02-24
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  • Publisher: Routledge

Whether commercial, personal, political, professional, or spiritual, knowledge was capital for the Victorians in their ongoing project of constructing a modern information-based society. Victorian Secrecy explores the myriad ways in which knowledge was both zealously accumulated and jealously guarded by individuals, institutions, and government entities in Victorian Britain. Offering a wide variety of critical approaches and disciplinary perspectives, the contributors examine secretive actors with respect to a broad range of subjects, including the narrator in Tess of the d'Urbervilles, John Henry Newman's autobiographical novel Loss and Gain, Richard Dadd's The Fairy Feller's Masterstroke, modes of detection in Bleak House, the secret history of Harriet Martineau's role in the repeal of the Corn Law, and Victorian stage magicians. Taken together, the essays provide a richly textured account of which modes of hiding and revealing articulate secrets in Victorian literature and culture; how social relations are formed and reformed in relationship to secrecy; and what was at stake individually, aesthetically, and culturally in the Victorians' clandestine activities.

The Oxford Handbook of Charles Dickens
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 848

The Oxford Handbook of Charles Dickens

The Oxford Handbook of Charles Dickens is a comprehensive and up-to-date collection on Dickens's life and works. It includes original chapters on all of Dickens's writing and new considerations of his contexts, from the social, political, and economic to the scientific, commercial, and religious. The contributions speak in new ways about his depictions of families, environmental degradation, and improvements of the industrial age, as well as the law, charity, and communications. His treatment of gender, his mastery of prose in all its varieties and genres, and his range of affects and dramatization all come under stimulating reconsideration. His understanding of British history, of empire and colonization, of his own nation and foreign ones, and of selfhood and otherness, like all the other topics, is explained in terms easy to comprehend and profoundly relevant to global modernity.

The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Poetry
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 887

The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Poetry

The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Poetry offers an authorative collection of original essays and is an essential resource for those interested in Victorian poetry and poetics.

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 1: The Medieval Period - Third Edition
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 900

The Broadview Anthology of British Literature Volume 1: The Medieval Period - Third Edition

In all six of its volumes The Broadview Anthology of British Literature presents British literature in a truly distinctive light. Fully grounded in sound literary and historical scholarship, the anthology takes a fresh approach to many canonical authors, and includes a wide selection of work by lesser-known writers. The anthology also provides wide-ranging coverage of the worldwide connections of British literature, and it pays attention throughout to issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. It includes comprehensive introductions to each period, providing in each case an overview of the historical and cultural as well as the literary background. It features accessible and enga...

The Unimagined in the English Renaissance
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 186

The Unimagined in the English Renaissance

This book is about description and image in Renaissance poetry, but focuses not on descriptions that present a vivid image to the reader’s mind but on those that seem to avoid doing so. Against the ancient and still active tradition that poetry is painting in words, it argues that poetry is most poetic when its goals are not visual.

The Men Who Knew Too Much
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 288

The Men Who Knew Too Much

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much. Self-imposed exiles fully in the know, they approached American and European society as inside-outsiders, a position that afforded them a kind of double vision. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended authorial and directorial control. Their fictions and films are obsessed with knowledge and its powers: who knows what? What is there to know? The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary. Over a dozen major scholars and critics take up works by James and Hitc...

Writing British Infanticide
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 292

Writing British Infanticide

The essays brought together in this volume pose the question: How are we to understand the proliferation of writing about child-murder in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain, or, more specifically, the overlap of an expanding print culture with the widely evident narration of this particular crime? Further, what are we to make of the recurrent and remarkably consistent representation of child-murder as the special province of unmarried, desperate women? Writing British Infanticide demonstrates the ways that narratives of child-murder in eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain reflect, and in certain ways elicit, complexity if not outright paradox: it was a capital crime for w...