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Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 219

Why Did the Soviet Union Collapse?

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1998
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  • Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

Examines the causes for the collapse of the Soviet Union, concentrating on the period after Mikhail Gorbachev's rise to power in the mid-1980s.

Science in Russia and the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 321

Science in Russia and the Soviet Union

By the 1980s the Soviet scientific establishment had become the largest in the world, but very little of its history was known in the West. What has been needed for many years in order to fill that gap in our knowledge is a history of Russian and Soviet science written for the educated person who would like to read one book on the subject. This book has been written for that reader. The history of Russian and Soviet science is a story of remarkable achievements and frustrating failures. That history is presented here in a comprehensive form, and explained in terms of its social and political context. Major sections include the tsarist period, the impact of the Russian Revolution, the relationship between science and Soviet society, and the strengths and weaknesses of individual scientific disciplines. The book also discusses the changes brought to science in Russia and other republics by the collapse of communism in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Daily Life in the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 320

Daily Life in the Soviet Union

Examines what daily life was like for ordinary people in the Soviet Union from 1917 to 1991, discussing government and law, the military, economy, class structure, housing, education, health care, the arts, religion, and other topics.

The Languages of the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 317

The Languages of the Soviet Union

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1981-06-04
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  • Publisher: CUP Archive

A general account of the languages of the Soviet Union, one of the most diverse multinational and multilingual states in the world as well as one of the most important. There are some 130 languages spoken in the USSR, belonging to five main families and ranging from Russian, which is the first language of about 130,000,000 people, to Aluet, spoken only by 96 (in the 1970 census). Dr Comrie has two general aims. First, he presents the most important structural features of these languages, their genetic relationships and classification and their distinctive typological features. Secondly, he examines the social and political background to the use of functioning of the various languages in a multilingual state. The volume will be of importance and interest to linguists and to those with a broader professional interest in the Soviet Union.

The Formation of the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 365

The Formation of the Soviet Union

Here is the history of the disintegration of the Russian Empire, and the emergence, on its ruins, of a multinational Communist state. In this revealing account, Richard Pipes tells how the Communists exploited the new nationalism of the peoples of the Ukraine, Belorussia, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Volga-Ural area--first to seize power and then to expand into the borderlands. The Formation of the Soviet Union acquires special relevance in the post-Soviet era, when the ethnic groups described in the book once again reclaimed their independence, this time apparently for good. In a 1996 Preface to the Revised Edition, Pipes suggests how material recently released from the Russian archives might supplement his account.

Writing History in the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 322

Writing History in the Soviet Union

The history of the Soviet Union has been charted in several studies over the decades. However, earlier examinations have failed to draw attention to the political and academic environment within which these histories were composed. Identifying the significant hallmarks of the production of Soviet history by Soviet as well as Western historians, this book attempts to fill this gap. It shows how the Russian Revolution of 1917 triggered a shift in official policy towards historians and the publication of history textbooks for schools and surveys the rich body of writing the Russian Revolution generated as well as the divergent approaches to the history of the period. The conditions for research in Soviet archives are described as an aspect of official monitoring of history writing, which continues to this day.

The Soviet Union in Asia
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 304

The Soviet Union in Asia

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Jews and Jewish Life in Russia and the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 432

Jews and Jewish Life in Russia and the Soviet Union

The main focus of this book is Jewish life under the Soviet regime. The themes of the book include: the attitude of the government to Jews, the fate of the Jewish religion and life in Post-World War II Russia. The volume also contains an assessment of the prospects for future emigration.

The Holocaust in the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 720

The Holocaust in the Soviet Union

The Holocaust in the Soviet Union is the most complete account to date of the Soviet Jews during the World War II and the Holocaust (1941?45). Reports, records, documents, and research previously unavailable in English enable Yitzhak Arad to trace the Holocaust in the German-occupied territories of the Soviet Union through three separate periods in which German political and military goals in the occupied territories dictated the treatment of the Jews. Arad?s examination of the differences between the Holocaust in the Soviet Union compared to other European nations reveals how Nazi ideological.

The Deportation of Peoples in the Soviet Union
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 217

The Deportation of Peoples in the Soviet Union

Drawing mostly on official documents, surveys the relocation of national groups by the Soviet government from the 1920s to the 1950s. Among the nationalities described are Russians, Koreans, Iranians moved to Kazakhstan, Karachais, Greeks, Chechens, Ingushes, and Moldavians. Also describes deported and mobilized Germans in the Far East during the 1