Seems you have not registered as a member of shareusefulinfo.in!

You may have to register before you can download all our books and magazines, click the sign up button below to create a free account.

Sign up

Anti-Poverty Psychology
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 218

Anti-Poverty Psychology

Psychology has focused more on personalities in poverty -- pathologizing -- than on contexts for poverty reduction (Pick & Sirkin, 2010). As a result, the discipline has inadvertently sequestered and isolated itself, and its potential contribution, from poverty reduction initiatives - globally and locally. In recent years, there have been major developments in both the scope and depth of psychological research on global development issues. Some of the key developments include significant advances in understanding of what motivates teachers in schools, on designing community interventions to promote health, and on managing the development of human “capacity” in aid and development projects. The Psychology of Poverty Reduction is poised to capture such advances in the understanding of ‘what works’ - and what does not.

Psychology and the Developing World
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 248

Psychology and the Developing World

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1996-04-18
  • -
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO

Previous leading commentators on the development of psychology in the Third World have conceived of three major stages: an attempt to assimilate Western psychology, with predictably negative results; the study of indigenous constructs, with more relevant applications; and, finally, transcending stage one and stage two to choose theories and methods on their applied merit alone. Psychology and the Developing World has been assembled to document how close psychology has come to researching that stage. Contributors were carefully selected to provide a unique overview of the latest applications of the discipline as a whole. Their work reveals how psychology is being applied to educational needs, management needs, and health needs. This book shows how development studies and allied disciplines cannot ignore psychology's potential for the Third World.

Globalization and Culture at Work
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 194

Globalization and Culture at Work

Behaviour at work can no longer be stereotyped as global or local – modern or traditional – with very little in-between. Instead work behaviour is a complex interplay between Global and Local values. It takes place in a Glocality. Thus individual achievement co-exists with group aspirations, pay diversity takes place in a social context, teamwork reflects cultural narrative, and labour mobility is bound by community bias. Globalization and Culture at Work: Exploring their Combined Glocality breaks new ground by exploring such glocalities, and the implications they create for managing human potential better. The volume is essential reading for researchers, managers, culturalists and consultants of work behaviour alike.

Social Psychology
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 472

Social Psychology

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2003-01-27
  • -
  • Publisher: Wiley

Social Psychology has been defined as the scientific investigation of how the thoughts, feelings and behaviours of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined or implied presence of others. It is a sub discipline of general psychology and is therefore concerned with explaining human behaviour in terms of processes that occur within the human mind, but it differs from individual psychology by seeking to explain social behaviour. Social Psychology deals with culture, gender and sex, social development, organisational psychology, criminal justice, health, mass media and sport. It intersects with other disciplines such as sociology, communication, cultural studies and political science; therefore it is subject to cultural references more than most other areas of study in psychology. Social psychology is taught at both second and third year in Universities. Most students of social psychology will be majoring in psychology, but the subject is also offered as an elective to students from education, social work and criminal justice, cultural studies and communication studies, depending on the institution. This book would be useful to any or all of these groups.

The Psychology of Global Mobility
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 342

The Psychology of Global Mobility

Human mobility has been a defining feature of human social evolution. In a global community, the term "mobility" captures the full gamut of types, directions, and patterns of human movement. The psychology of mobility is important because movement is inherently behavioral. Much of the behavioral study of mobility has focused on the negative – examining the trauma of forced migration, or the health consequences of the lack of adaptation – but this work looks into the benefits of mobility, such as its impact on career capital and well-being. Recent years have witnessed a phenomenal increase in efforts to understand human mobility, by social scientists, think-tanks, and policymakers alike. The book focuses on the transformational potential of mobility for human development. The book details the historical, methodological, and theoretical trajectory of human mobility (Context), followed by sections on pre-departure incentives and predispositions (Motivation), influences on acculturation, health and community fit (Adjustment), and changes in career capital, overcoming bias, and diaspora networks (Performance).

Poverty and Psychology
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 320

Poverty and Psychology

This volume is constituted of a collection of leading contributions, each focusing on understanding the global dynamics of poverty and wealth together, from a psychological (particularly social psychological) perspective. It is one of few (if any) books on the subject that combines psychological theory and research with community development and practice.

Motivation and Culture
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 256

Motivation and Culture

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2014-06-11
  • -
  • Publisher: Routledge

Although a growing number of researchers emphasize the social and psychocultural aspects of motivation and motivation theory, few books have provided much coverage beyond well-tread studies of physiological and biological factors and theories. Motivation and Culture brings together eighteen writers with a variety of academic backgrounds and cultural experiences to explore the way that culture impinges on motivation. Exploring topics such as personal values and motives, intercultural exchange in the workplace, the intrapsychic process and the nexus between biology and culture, they formulate theories of motivation that can be applied in the modern multicultural world. Contributors include: Dona Lee Davis, Russell Geen, Joan Miller, John Paul Scott, William Wedenoja, Elisa J. Sobo and Stephen Wilson.

Humanitarian Work Psychology
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 359

Humanitarian Work Psychology

Contextualizing Humanitarian work in history, justice, methods and professional ethics, this book articulates process skills for transformational partnerships between diverse organizations, motivating education, organisational learning and selecting the disaster workforce.

Psychology of Aid
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 272

Psychology of Aid

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1998-05-14
  • -
  • Publisher: Routledge

Psychology of Aid provides an original, psychological approach to development studies, focusing as it does on the social aspects of aid and the motivational foundations. Designed as a practical tool for looking at development projects in a new and structured way, the authors bring many of the social apsects of development and aid together in one book; from the needs of the Northern donor to the public tensions between Third World host and foreign development agencies.

The Aid Triangle
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 184

The Aid Triangle

The Aid Triangle focuses on the human dynamics of international aid and illustrates how the aid system incorporates power relationships, and therefore relationships of dominance. Using the concept of a triangle of dominance, justice and identity, this timely work explains how the experience of injustice is both a challenge and a stimulus to personal, community and national identity, and how such identities underlie the human potential that international aid should seek to enrich. This insightful new critique provides for the reader an innovative and constructive framework for producing more empowering and more effective aid.